Category Archives: Refashions

Sorrento Bucket Hat is Tops

The Sorrento Bucket hat is a popular free pattern by Elbe Textiles.  The unisex pattern comes in XS-L sizes to fit heads between 21 and 24 inches and has 3 pieces: brim, band, and top. There are two seams in the band and brim. I traced out the other side of the band and brim pieces because I didn’t want to cut my fabric on the fold.

My head measures 22 and a half inches putting me between a small and medium. I chose to make the medium size.

The recommended fabric is denim, canvas, twill, or similar medium to heavyweight fabric.  It is a fully reversible hat so I wanted to use 2 different fabrics.  I upcycled the pants legs from 2 pairs of pants I never wore.

Even though this is not sewing in a straight line, the hat isn’t hard to sew.  There’s a lot of manual fabric manipulation involved, pinning, and cutting notches into the pieces to make them fit together. It’s like a little sewing exercise in sewing a circular object.

The pattern is well illustrated. There are 6 steps, starting with the brim. The seam allowance is 1 cm which corresponds to about 3/8 of an inch or a scant 1/2 inch.

I topstitched several circles around the 2 layers of the brim.

I became a little confused when I got to step 4, the step that attaches the top to the band creating the bucket part of the hat. The instructions mention both snipping into the seam allowance of the band, and matching notches on the band and top.  I didn’t know if that meant to cut notches like I did on the brim, and at first I didn’t even notice the notches marked on the pattern pieces.  The band seemed too small for the top, and didn’t fit together.  For a crazy second, the thought of cutting the top circle smaller flashed in my head. I think a clarification would be to differentiate between “easing notches” that are cut into the fabric,  and “matching notches” that are used to align the two pieces together evenly.  The band needs many easing notches to fit the top, and easing notches are cut into the top after sewing it together with the band to make a smooth circular shape.

I wasn’t sure whether to sew with the top side or the band side facing up. I believe the band side should be face up when sewing so the baste stitch on the band is visible and the seam can be sewn just a tad farther in from the seam allowance.

I place and remove pins with my left hand.

The wrong side of my flowered lining fabric is white.

This is messy work; keep the lint roller handy.

In step 5 the brim is sewn to the lining bucket.

In step 6 the top bucket is sewn to the rest of the hat, and two becomes one.

Done!

The fit is spot on.

So pretty with the flowered/leafy side peeking out from the underside.

 

 

Here I’m wearing the hat with the first dress I sewed back in 2013.

I really like these two fabrics together. Other fabric combinations like a classic khaki and black would work well.  I can even imagine using a print to match a top or dress. A lighter fabric could be interfaced, especially on the brim.  I made my hat without interfacing, and like how crushable it is, making it easy to fit in a bag.

I think anyone who knows how to work a sewing machine could make this hat. If you have some sturdy fabric on hand, or unwanted denim or twill pants, why not transform them to a Sorrento bucket hat?

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Denim Shorts and a Refashion For Two

I have been holding on to about a yard and a half of stretch denim I bought at my now closed neighborhood thrift store for several years.

It wasn’t quite enough for a long pants version of the Itch to Stitch Mountain View Pull-on Jeans, so I decided to use the same pattern for a shorts version.  I already sewed this pattern two times previously this year: these green pants and these gray pants.

I bought topstitching thread and jeans rivets for this make. I’ve read about some machines not being able to handle the thickness of topstitching thread so i practiced on a scrap.  This thread’s thick!

comparison of all purpose thread and topstitching thread

No problems and looking good!

I also practiced installing a rivet.  They are installed by making a hole in the fabric with an awl, and then hammering them in.  The difficult part for me was cutting down the posts, as I didn’t have a tool strong enough.

If the post is too long it will crack through the rivet.

one rivet installed, discarded cracked rivet on the right

I had to improvise to find a hard surface for hammering them in.  I used the back of a cast iron skillet.  Next time I will follow advice to use a block of wood.

I chose to eliminate the back leg seam of the original pattern.  The previous time I made the pattern I traced a new pattern piece after sewing the two back pieces together.

I love these shorts!  The fit is perfect. The waistband stays put with no slippage yet they are very comfortable when sitting down.  I haven’t had a pair of denim shorts that fit for several years, and they go with so many of my summer tops. The shorts have creases in the photos because I couldn’t wait until I photographed them to start wearing them!

front view

back pockets

front pocket bags

In the top photo I’m wearing them with my I love this fabric refashion,  but I have a new refashion to show you.

I’ve had this knee length rayon challis dress with a beautiful Hawaiian print in my closet for almost 20 years.  I’ve gained weight over the years and it no longer fit, but still I hung on to it.

I laid another refashioned rayon sleeveless top over the bottom of the dress, and thought it would be just wide enough to make a top.  I used store bought bias tape for the armholes and neckline.  I didn’t take apart the side seams so had to pinch out armhole darts to remove the excess flap of fabric that formed when I tried the top on.

 

I love it!  I like the way the high side slits from the original dress hem show off my rivets ( I put 4 in the front) on the shorts.

What to do with the top of the dress?

I saved the best for last…..

I grabbed the leis for some twinning with my dog Sparky in his matching shirt.

I am so thrilled to add these two pieces to my closet.  They will be summer staples for me!

Silk Shirt into Kimono Jacket Refashion

I have wanted to do a kimono jacket refashion since 2015 when I saw it on Portia’s refashioners challenge.  Her Makery blog tutorial uses two shirts.

I had this thrifted men’s Perry Ellis size large shirt in my stash.  I thought the fabric felt like a very soft peachskin rayon, and then rechecked the label.  No, this is silk. Perfect!

I cut off the collar, buttons bands, and the hem.  I cut a line from the shoulder to the hem on a slight diagonal.  I pieced together a long facing strip from the cut off portions, sewed it around the full length of the jacket, and rehemmed it shorter in the front.  I then turned the facing to the wrong side, pressed it with the seam rolled to the inside, and stitched it down.

the shirt is turned back on the right side of the photo to show the facing

Can you believe how easy this was?

Easy, breezy style.

Bird of Paradise Shirt Refashion

It’s another “I love this print” refashion.

I knew which thrift store shirt I wanted to make over to wear this spring.  The soft rayon print has big bird of paradise flowers and also a background of vertical blue stripes.  I like it even in its original XL size as an overshirt, although that armhole depth is super deep.

I used New Look 6598, the view on the bottom right with a collarless v-neck and short sleeves, for my pattern pieces. I like the way this style of shirt looks like a jacket.

I had to place the front piece in the best spot to use the existing button placket.  The problem that resulted was a large space in the middle of the bust with no buttons.  If I were sewing a shirt from scratch, a button would be placed at the fullness of the bust to prevent gaping.

What to do?  Lean closer and I’ll tell you: I sewed a secret button.

location of secret buttonhole

I sewed a buttonhole between the buttons and a button on the inside of the shirt on the buttonhole side of the placket. It is invisible when buttoned as the button is on the wrong side of the shirt.

I remembered seeing this technique on Handmade Jane’s blog. It works well, although my shirt should have more ease over the bust.

I sewed bust darts, and omitted the waist contour darts and the back tie. The v-neck was a little awkward so I also added the tiny neck button from the original shirt at the top of the shirt for more coverage.

 

The I Love This Fabric Refashion

I don’t do much thrift shopping anymore, but I still have a pile of clothes for refashioning possibilities.

There was less fabric than you might think to work with in this size small rayon dress with a shirred top and high-low hem.  I almost left it behind, but I loved the two tone print.

Because it was truly small, I didn’t cut it apart at the side seams because I was afraid it would become too narrow at the bust and hips when resewn.

As the photo shows, I simply cut off the top, cut a scoop for the neckline, cut down 10 inches for armholes, sewed the shoulders, and cut a new hem.  I finished the neck and armholes with ready made bias binding.  I needed every bit of length for the front, which is a little shorter than I would like.   I didn’t add any dart shaping so it’s free flowing from the bust and hangs away from my body. I like the longer back.

This refashion was completed last year.  Next up, my first project in 2018.  I finished something in January from my make nine list! Can you guess which one?

Button Front Denim Skirt Refashion

I found some great 1970s skirt patterns at my small neighborhood thrift store.

I also bought this long button front denim skirt with pockets there.  I want the basic a-line shape of the first pattern but this time I’m taking a shortcut using this secondhand garment.

Look closer:  I’m not wearing it!  I’m just holding it up to my waist because the skirt waist is itty-bitty tiny and mine no longer is.

So I cut out the pockets and snipped all the way across to get rid of the tiny top which left the skirt with a huge waist.  I unpicked the hem just at the side seams and cut my new a-line shape keeping the width at the bottom and narrowing at the waist to a just right size.

Before sewing, I switched to a denim needle on my machine. I added two darts front and back.  I struggled with reattaching the pockets.  They had a long opening like side seam pockets but they were inset pockets folded over.

Sometimes it can be easier sewing from scratch than trying to figure out how to rework something.

On to the waistband, which I cut, interfaced, folded over, and sewed on.  I attached bias binding to the raw edge.

The last step: making a new buttonhole on the waistband.  The top buttonhole is horizontal, and the rest are vertical.  A horizontal button is more secure, and can take more stress.

I finished by top stitching the top and bottom of the waistband.

And there you have it : a basic casual classic  to wear about town.  Like this:

I feel like an editor for a fashion magazine setting up an outfit shot.  The little patchwork denim purse is also thrifted.

How I wore it:

Or as worn with another of the kimono sleeve tees I made from a big thrifted tee shirt.  The tee is actually a pretty aqua shade but the sun is bleaching the color out in the photo.

 

A Simple Dress Refashion

I bought a long dress from the thrift store even though I knew it was too tight for me in the bodice.  The waist and hips were plenty roomy.  The dress is rayon with a small rose print on a black background.

The style featured ties emerging from the side seams below the bust further emphasizing the too tight fit in that area.

I was being a little dramatic making it look like I popped the button in the photo!

Rose Print Dress Before

When I bought the dress I thought I would make it into a skirt, but I really preferred to have a dress.  I don’t have enough dresses, and need more for the ease of wearing – no matching of a top and bottom needed – and hopefully figure lengthening properties.

What to do?

I made three little changes that made a big difference!

I hemmed the dress at knee length.

I removed the side ties, sewed them together, and made a belt to be worn at the natural waist.

Bodice Close-up

I cut the neckline lower into a v-shape removing the top button.  That gave me more “give” across the bust, and suddenly the bodice fit.  I also wore a different bra that helped the fit, and I might have lost a few pounds, but not many as both before and after photos were taken in the same month.

I was going to make inseam pockets with the leftover fabric,  but was having a really hard time unpicking the seam, so I ended up scrapping that idea.

Rose Shirtdress After

Rose Shirtdress Back

Just a few little changes, and my figure looks much more balanced.  Wouldn’t you agree?

shirtdress-beforeafter-800x800

 

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