It’s Time for Pants – Simplicity 1967

I’ve been a little worried about making pants.  I’ve read about how difficult they are to fit; there is crotch length and depth to consider while trying to figure out what terms like “scooping the crotch” means.  I didn’t even know how the pants pieces looked, or how to sew them together.

I wanted to make very comfortable, lightweight cotton pants for wearing around the house, and Simplicity 1967 seemed to fit the bill.  This is one of the earliest patterns  I bought, from a quilt store that has since closed.  The pattern cover assures me it’s easy, so I figured it would be a good introduction to pants sewing.  The pants have patch pockets and a separate waistband with a drawstring. I paired it with some blue gingham cotton fabric I had bought with pants in mind.

I tested the pattern by making it up with a sheet.  I noticed that the legs were very baggy on me, and that while the rise in the front was plenty high, the rise in the back was too low.

I needed to add more length in the back.  I added 3/4 inch at the center back tapering to nothing at the side, and I also slashed below the notches and added an inch in back length to the pattern.

center back waist raised

crotch length back alteration

I tapered the legs on both sides to take off some of the excess roominess.  I drafted my own patch pockets, making them larger with a top that is caught in the waistband and an angled opening.  I also added elastic in the casing. Since the pants are pull-on, they’re fitted for the hips, and I wanted them to pull in a bit at the waist.

I didn’t understand how to sew them up from the directions.  The pieces didn’t seem to fit together.  I found this pajama tutorial that was very helpful, and I used the method of putting  a right side out leg into a wrong side out leg to sew the crotch.

I’m proud of my pretty little eyelet buttonholes, and the pretty bias bound waist seam with the ribbon label on the inside.

Gingham Pants Pockets and Drawstring Waist

Inside Waistband of Pants with Bias Binding

These were easy, and a quick make.  The part that took the longest was seam finishing, and inserting the elastic.  I made a mistake, and had to unpick to leave a space to insert the elastic.

Just what I wanted!  I am enjoying wearing these pants.

Causual Drawstring Pants

Cotton Gingham Pants Sitting

Gingham doesn’t photograph well.

Simplicity 1967 Drawstring Pants

Have you ever gone to the store to try to replace a favorite piece of clothing and can’t find what you want?  Well, I won’t have that problem with these pants.  I can whip up another easily.   I will be making more pants, shorts, and pajama shorts in the future.  I also have a  pants pattern with a side zipper and one with a mock fly front when I’m ready to change it up.

P.S.  The change I made to the length of the back piece is an alteration of the crotch depth, and scooping the crotch, when done to the back piece,  is lowering the curve to give more room for the buttocks.

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “It’s Time for Pants – Simplicity 1967

  1. KerryCan

    This is very cool–the sense of empowerment you must feel! I’ve never really tried to make clothing, and I doubt I ever will, but I’m fascinated with your progress!

    Reply
  2. seweverythingblog

    Great looking summer pants. I agree with KerryCan above. That feeling of empowerment is wonderful after creating a successful garment. Looking forward to seeing more pant sewing from you.

    Reply
  3. Tereza

    Oh those pants are cute! I need to really learn how to fit pants. It is one of those to do list items, that just makes me groan before I cut another cute top, dress, etc.

    Reply
  4. Pingback: Blue Gingham Part II – Shorts from McCalls 6901 | Stitch It Again

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s